Tag Archive for WW1 Centenary

From the Somme to Sangin – a century of Muslim service to Britain

As we come together to remember 100 years since the Somme, Steve Ballinger reports from an Armed Forces Iftar marking a century of Muslim service to Britain

WW1 heritage brings Leicester communities together

Avaes Mohammed reports from Leicester workshops telling the shared WW1 stories of Muslim, Hindu and Sikh soldiers fighting for Britain

Leicester Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs come together to learn shared WW1 history

A new Leicester project is bringing together members of the Hindu, Muslim and Sikh communities to learn and celebrate their shared history of contribution to Britain in the First World War.

How remembrance can help bring us together

Wearing the Remembrance poppy can help unite Britons from different faiths and ethnicities, says new research backed by Business Secretary Sajid Javid

The Dulmial Gun – a ‘hidden history’ of Pakistan’s soldiers of WW1

At the centre of a small village in the mountainous Salt Range region of Pakistan, sits a nineteenth century British cannon. Dulmial – known within Pakistan simply as ‘the village with the gun’ – was presented with the artillery piece in 1925 in recognition of the service and sacrifice of the village’s inhabitants prior to and during the First World War.

‘Poppy Headscarf’ launches to mark centenary of first Victoria Cross for Muslim soldier

A new ‘Poppy Headscarf’ launches today, backed by the Islamic Society of Britain, to raise money for the Poppy Appeal and offer British Muslims a new way to mark Remembrance.

Legacy of Sikh and Muslim soldiers of WW1 explored

British Future’s recent study into public attitudes to the First World War centenary showed that the single biggest increase in public knowledge about WW1 relates to the contribution of soldiers from the Empire and the Commonwealth who fought for Britain. Things Unseen produced two radio programmes looking at the contribution of Muslim and Sikh soldiers, why they fought, and the importance of that historical legacy now.

New study finds strong appetite for learning WW1 history

A new study by British Future shows that the media, government and public bodies have set the right tone for the First World War centenary, and an appetite remains to learn more about Britain’s history.

‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’ – WW1 Commemoration

The installation ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’, designed by ceramic artist Paul Cummins, which commemorates those fallen during the First World War already covers a huge swathe of the Tower of London’s dry moat, writes Joe Cryer.

Why the world won’t fall out over WW1 centenary

As the British government seeks to ensure that centenary activities fully mark the contribution of Empire and Commonwealth soldiers, can it find common ground to reflect Australian and Canadian pride in the birth of a nation, Indian and Pakistani concerns about getting the form of recognition right, and South African scepticism about the contemporary relevance of a conflict fought between long lost Empires, asks Sunder Katwala.

Britons prefer solemn centenary to marking Great War victory

The British public strongly prefer a solemn remembrance of the lives lost in the first world war to a centenary commemoration which places a central emphasis on Britain's victory of the war, according to new Ipsos MORI polling for British Future.

Victory for VCs as commemoration scheme amended

Local campaigners across the country won a small but important victory last week, as the government agreed to amend a flawed first world war commemoration scheme, writes Steve Ballinger .

“Centenary will help bring a new insight into WWI”

With the centenary of the commencement of the Great War approaching, an opportunity presents itself to remember, to reflect, and to renew our national understanding of the shared histories that draw us together, as well as the way we pass on those understandings and identities to our children, says school teacher Michael Merrick.

“Inspire children and parents to learn more history in run up to WWI centenary”

Nearly two thirds (60%) of 16 to 24 year olds can’t name the year that WWI ended, and just ahead of the centenary 54% of the same age group can’t name the date of the start of the war, according to new research from British Future.

The poppy in Ireland: to wear or not to wear?

Irish questions of remembrance and forgetting, identity and reconciliation came very much to the fore as the Battle of Ideas festival audience debated what wearing the Remembrance Day poppy meant to them, writes Sunder Katwala.