Tag Archive for migration

This World Cup, cry God for Harry, St George… and Belgium?

In this migrant-majority World Cup, eleven of the Belgian squad live and work in England. With our own team out of the hunt, has the time come to cheer for Belgium, asks Sunder Katwala.

VIDEO: Achieving a fair deal on migration

A new video by the Institute for Public Policy Research sets out a series of new policy proposals regarding how the UK should approach immigration.

Public more confident that we can talk about immigration – new findings

The public are growing in confidence that we can and do talk about immigration, writes Sunder Katwala.

Britain great place for business, say migrant entrepreneurs

The United Kingdom is a great place to do business, and attracts enterprising people from all over the world, writes Henry Hill.

REPORT: EU migration from Romania and Bulgaria

On 1st January 2014, Britain opens its borders to Romania and Bulgaria. It is a moment being greeted not with fanfares of Beethoven’s Ode to Joy, but with the more reluctant mantra ‘we have no choice’, with a heated public debate polarising around two viewpoints.

Employees see skilled migration as a workplace success story

The public is often portrayed as opposed to migration, and opinion polls do show it is a key issue for voters. But new research by NIESR, published today, finds that members of the public who work with migrants recognise the need for skilled migration. They also willingly acknowledge that they have benefited, writes Dr Heather Rolfe.

Why Windrush Day matters

The MV Empire Windrush started its life as a vehicle for the Nazi Party and ended its life under the control of the Allied forces, transporting 493 passengers from Jamaica to the UK, thus transforming it into a symbol of multiculturalism and tolerance. Patrick Vernon OBE, founder of 100 Great Black Britons, was the first to call for a national celebration of Windrush Day. Here Vernon explains why it matters.

Who do we think we are? Britain in 2012

British Future's Matthew Rhodes gave a speech in Dudley on International Migrants Day, at a Migrants Alive event run by the 5 Estates Plus Project. Read what he said.

“Mongrel nation”: How is the face of Britain seen now?

Twenty years ago Time magazine put a composite photograph on its front cover. It was generated by an IBM 486 computer and fused together the phenotypical features of the world’s six main racial groups. The face that emerged was that of a woman with a striking, yet blended, appearance. The purpose was to sneak preview a mid-twentieth century future in which growing global migration and cross marriage would produce Global Woman, writes professor of political science at the University of Sussex Shamit Saggar.

“Coalition of the rational” could defend migration, says shadow minister

A “coalition of the rational” could unite politicians across the major parties and secure public support for the types of immigration that most people think is in Britain’s interests, shadow immigration minister Chris Bryant told a Progress and British Future fringe event at the Labour party conference in Manchester.

Generation 2012 audience listening

What do generation 2012 think about immigration?

Young Britons struggling to find work in austerity Britain find themselves at the sharp end of immigrant competition, so you might expect them to be tougher on this issue than their parents, says one of the author’s of the new BSA report Rob Ford.

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Review: Migrations: Journeys into British art

The Tate's new Migrations exhibition doesn't communicate the complex experiences of migration, but does have a varied display of art, says Georgia Hussey.

Katwala interviewed by Paxman on migrant benefits

British Future director Sunder Katwala was interviewed by Newsnight's Jeremy Paxman on the subject of people

Migration evidence should deepen public debate

British Future trustee Shamit Saggar, and a contributor to today's Migration Advisory Commitee report, says robust evidence should help to inform a public debate that recognises both benefits and costs.

Labour’s immigration muddle, and a conference of confusion

Sunder Katwala looks back at how the Labour conference dealt (or didn't deal) with the immigration issue.